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SUMMER TERM 



OF THE 



Western 
State Normal School 

KALAMAZOO, MICHIGAN 



Monday, June 26, to Friday, August 4 
1916 



FACULTY OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



D. B. WALDO, A. M., LL. D., President. 
FANNIE L. BALLOU, 

Second Grade, Training School. 
AMELIA BISCOMB, 

English. 
VANETTA BISSELL, 

Public School Art. 
HAROLD BLAIR, A. B., 

Mathematics. 
ERNEST BURNHAM, Ph. D, 

Rural School Director. 
C. H. CARRICK, A. B., Superintendent of Schools, Charlotte, 

Geography. 

W. E. CONKLING, Superintendent of Schools, Eau Claire, 

Civics. 
BERTHA S. DAVIS, 

Public School Music. 
SUSIE M. ELLETT, A. B., 

Rural School Methods. 
F. E. ELLSWORTH, A. B., 

Director of Training School. 
NELLA E. DIETRICH, Director Benzie County Normal, 

Management and Course of Study. 
JOHN P. EVERETT, A. M., 

Mathematics. 
LORETTA FITZPATRICK, Director Cass County Normal, 

Management and Course of Study. 
ELVA M. FORNCROOK, A. B., 

Expression. 
JOHN E. FOX, A. B., 

Physics. 

CYNTHIA A. GREEN, Commissioner of Schools, Eaton 
County, 
Rural Education. 



4 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

H. P. GREENWALL, B. L., 

Penmanship. 
GERMAINE GUIOT, Graduate of Sargent School, 

Physical Education. 
LUCIA C. HARRISON, A. B, 

Geography. 
L. H. HARVEY, Ph. D., 

Biology. 
H. GLENN HENDERSON, 

Public School Music. 
T. P. HICKEY, A. B., 

History. 
J. C. HOEKJE, Supt. of Schools, Grand Haven, 

Psychology. 
FRED S. HUFF, Public Schools, Kalamazoo, 

Manual Training. 

E. D. HUNTINGTON, B. S., 

Biology. 
BESSIE HUNTOON, Director Mecosta County Normal, 

Rural School Methods. 
MARGARET HUTTY, 

Domestic Science. 
JUDSON A. HYAMES, 

Athletics. 
C. D. JENNINGS, Public Schools, St. Joseph, 

Arithmetic. 

F. A. JENSEN, Supt. of Schools, Benton Harbor, 

School Administration. 
M. W. LONGMAN, Supt. of Schools, Owosso, 
Mathematics. 

FRANCES R. KERN, 

Kindergarten. 
LLOYD MANLEY, 

Manual Training. 
HARPER C. MAYBEE, 

Public School Music. 
NELLIE M'CONNELL, 

Training School. 



summer bulletin 5 

william Mccracken, ph. d., 

Chemistry. 
FRED A. MIDDLEBUSH, A. M., 

History. 
MARY A. MOORE, 

Domestic Science. 
KATHERINE MULRY, 

Training School. 
MARY MUNRO, A. B, 

Rural Observation School. 
FLORENCE B. MURPHY, A. B., 

English. 
ROSE NETZORG, 

Public School Art. 
BLANCHE PEPPLE, Director Grand Traverse County Normal, 

Geography. 

ELEANOR RAWLINSON, Union High School, Grand Rapids, 
English. 

ROSAMOND REED, Graduate Sargent School, 

Physical Education. 
ROBERT M. REINHOLD, B. Pd., 

Education and Normal Extension. 
F. E. ROBINSON, Commissioner of Schools, Branch County, 

Grammar. 

RUTH M. ROGERS, Ph. B., 

Expression. 
E. V. ROOT, Commissioner of Schools, Van Buren County, 

Agriculture. 
LA VINA SPINDLER, 

Methods. 
EMILIE TOWNSEND, B. S., 

Training School. 
GEORGE S. WAITE, 

Manual Training. 
EVA WARRINER, Director Calhoun County Normal, 

Reading and Orthography. 
ELISABETH ZIMMERMAN, A. B., 

German. 



WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



LIBRARY 



ESTHER BRALEY, A. B., 

Librarian. 
ANNA L. FRENCH, 

Assistant Librarian. 

AMELIA ANDERSON, 

Assistant Librarian. 



OFFICES 



KATHERINE NEWTON, 
Secretary. 

NATALIE MURPHY, 

BERNICE HESSELINK, 

MARIE C. COLE, 

Clerk, Training School. 



Summer Term of the Western 
State Normal School 



THE thirteenth annual summer term of the Western State 
Normal School will open June 26, 1916, and continue six 
weeks, closing August 4. Students will be enrolled and 
classified on Monday, June 26, and classes in all departments will 
begin recitations on Tuesday, June 27. Nearly all of the regular 
instructors of the Normal School will remain in residence dur- 
ing the Summer Term, and will be assisted by a number of 
outside teachers selected for their efficiency in special lines of 
work. 

LOCATION 

The Western State Normal School is located in Kalamazoo, 
the County Seat of Kalamazoo County, in the heart of South- 
western Michigan. In beauty, in accessibility, in general edu- 
cational advantages, this thriving city of forty-five thousand in- 
habitants affords an ideal location for the school. 

Kalamazoo is at the intersection of the great lines of travel 
in Western Michigan. It is the half-way point between Detroit 
and Chicago on the main line of the Michigan Central Railway, 
which is here crossed by the Grand Rapids & Indiana, the Lake 
Shore & Michigan Southern, and the Chicago, Kalamazoo & 
Saginaw railroads, all running north and south. It is the 
eastern terminus of the South Haven branch of the Michigan 
Central which gives excellent connections with Chicago by boat. 
It is also the eastern terminus of the Kalamazoo, Lake Shore & 
Chicago Railroad. The Chicago and Grand Trunk Railway now 
has direct connection with the main line of that road by way of 
Pavilion. The electric lines of the Michigan United Traction 
Company give trolley connections with the eastern part of the 
State via Battle Creek and Jackson. The new electric line con- 
necting Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo gives excellent serv- 
ice to all points between these cities. On the various railways 
nearly one hundred trains arrive and depart daily giving ex- 
cellent connections with all the surrounding territory. 



8 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

The advantages of Kalamazoo as a place of residence are 
unquestioned. The city is beautiful in situation and is well 
kept. The climate is healthful, the water supply excellent, and 
the sanitary conditions are unusually good. Situated in the 
center of a fine farming country it is widely known for its 
diversified industries and educational advantages. 

PURPOSE OF THE SCHOOL 

The purpose of the school as constituted by law is to prepare 
teachers for the public schools. The work of the Normal is or- 
ganized and conducted essentially to this end. It is recognized 
that scholarship, knowledge of child nature, and a proper atti- 
tude toward the work of teaching are the three essential factors 
in all professional preparation for teachers. The course of study 
in the Western State Normal School has been planned with the 
purpose of providing for these ends by giving as thorough knowl- 
edge of the subject matter as possible in the time devoted to 
the work, by emphasizing the principles underlying the educa- 
tional process, and by keeping before the mind of the student 
the realization that the highest aims of education are character 
and service. All facilities possible will be offered for the fur- 
therance of these purposes and for bringing the student into 
contact with the best in modern thought and life. The spirit 
of hearty co-operation between faculty and students in enter- 
prises and interests of the school is fostered at all times. 

The responsibility for the proper attitude of students toward 
the school and community is necessarily for the most part 
thrown upon the students themselves. While it is the purpose of 
the school to incite the student continually to higher and better 
ideals of character and public service, it is impracticable for a 
normal school to attempt the task of reforming young men and 
women. No personal effort will be spared in assisting students 
in every possible way, but those who are manifestly lacking in 
the essentials of good character, or in ability to become efficient 
instructors of children, will be requested, whenever the evidence 
of their unfitness is complete, to withdraw from the school. 

During the summer term special attention will be given to 

who are already teaching and those who plan to teach 

during the coming year. Courses of study, plans of work, 

methods of instruction, will be shaped to the needs of teachers 

engaged in the profession. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 9 

BUILDINGS 

1. Administration Building. This structure contains, in addi- 
tion to the administration offices, fourteen class rooms, an 
assembly room, and the library and reading room. The Normal 
Co-operative Store is located on the first floor. The site occu- 
pied by the administration building is well known for the pano- 
ramic view of Kalamazoo and the surrounding country. 

2. Training School Building. This training building is a fine 
structure of two stories and a basement. This structure, 118 
feet long and 100 feet wide, is one of the best planned of its 
kind in the country. In completeness and convenience the build- 
ing is a model. The kindergarten, 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 7th grades will 
be in regular session each forenoon during the entire term, 
affording students opportunity for observation. The training 
school building will also provide recitation rooms for review 
classes. 

3. Gymnasium. The gymnasium is the largest among the 
normal schools of the country. The main room is 119 feet 
long and 68 feet wide, the floor being entirely clear of posts 
or obstructions of any kind. The running track, 9j^ feet wide, 
is suspended from the structural steel supporting the roof of 
the building. In the basement are lockers, shower baths for 
men and women, and a swimming pool 52 feet long. All classes 
in public school gymnastics will meet in the gymnasium. 

4. Science Building. The new science building fully equipped 
will be in general use during the summer term. It is located 
directly west of the gymnasium and covers a ground area 
148 feet long and 78 feet wide. The building is three full 
stories above the basement. The first floor affords rooms and 
laboratories for the departments of psychology and geography. 
The department of biology is housed on the second floor and on 
the third floor are recitation rooms and laboratories for the de- 
partments of physics and chemistry. The new building and its 
splendid equipment greatly increase the efficiency of the several 
departments of science. 

5. Manual Training. The department of manual training has 
good quarters in the manual training building of the public 
school system of Kalamazoo. Additional facilities are provided 
in three well equipped rooms and shops in the normal school 
buildings. 



10 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

THE LIBRARY 

The library numbers 14,000 volumes. It includes good work- 
ing material of recent date. Book purchases have all been made 
within ten years. The departments of Art, Domestic Art and 
Science, Education, English, German, History, Manual Training, 
Mathematics, Music, and Science are well represented. Large 
additions of reference material have been made during the past 
year. 

One hundred and eighty periodicals are taken and forty 
complete sets are shelved in the reading room; students are 
given free access to reading room and stack room. 

A representative selection of children's books is furnished 
by the State Library. This collection is open for inspection and 
gives an unusual opportunity for teachers to become acquainted 
with the best books for children in the most suitable and attrac- 
tive editions. 

The Kalamazoo Public Library with a collection of 45,000 
volumes is open to all students of the Normal School. 

CREDIT 

Credits applying on the certificate courses may be earned in 
any of the subjects regularly required. Twenty-four weeks (one- 
half of a full term's credit) is usually the maximum credit for 
any student during the summer term. Classes reciting daily or- 
dinarily earn six weeks of credit, while those reciting twice each 
day earn twelve weeks of credit. 

DEMAND FOR TEACHERS 

There is an increasing demand for trained teachers through- 
out the state and in the country at large. The tendency of sal- 
aries is upward, and teaching is nearer a profession than ever 
before. Graduates of the Western Normal are in demand, and 
much care is exercised in placing students of the school where 
the likelihood of success and the opportunity to serve are 
greatest. 

EXPENSES 

The tuition fee is $3.00 for all students who reside in Michi- 
gan. For those living outside of Michigan the fee is $5.00. 
1 here is a fee of $1.00 for the support of athletics. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 11 

There are convenient rooms in the vicinity of the school suffi- 
cient to house 1,200 or more students. The cost of room and 
board varies. The average cost is from $4.00 to $5.00 a week. 
The entire expense in Kalamazoo for the six weeks' summer 
term need not exceed $35.00 to $50.00. 

The city of Kalamazoo affords many opportunities for re- 
munerative employment for both young men and young women. 
Students desiring work with a view to lessening the expense 
of attending school are assisted in securing employment of 
various kinds. 

THE NORMAL CO-OPERATIVE STORE 

The Normal Co-operative Store which has been in operation 
during the past four years will be open during the summer 
term, affording opportunity for students to purchase books and 
other necessary supplies at low prices. 

The Co-operative Store enjoys a large student patronage. 
During the present school year the store will transact a business 
of approximately $11,000. 

THE KALAMAZOO NORMAL RECORD 

The Record serves as a clearing house for the educational 
activities of the Normal. Timely articles on present questions 
are contributed by members of the faculty. The Training 
School, the departments of Art, Domestic Art and Science, Edu- 
cation, English, Expression, German, History, Kindergarten, 
Mathematics, Music, Physical Training, and Science furnish 
many articles of great practical value to teachers. This material 
is usable and serviceable as it is the record of successful work 
in the Normal itself. The subscription price is fifty cents a year 
for ten issues. The July number this year will be devoted to 
the interests of the summer school. 

ATHLETICS 

Due attention will be given to various forms of athletics 
during the summer term. Baseball and tennis will be prominent 
features of outdoor athletics. Eight tennis courts will be at the 
disposal of students and attention will also be given to other 
outdoor games and sports that may be used in public schools. 

The new athletic field of 14 acres lies just across Oakland 
Drive from the Normal campus. The field has been graded, 



12 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

seeded, and drained. The baseball diamond and the new up-to- 
date quarter mile track will be in use during the summer term. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

As in former years a social committee selected from the 
faculty will provide special features of entertainment with a 
view to securing a variety of interests and affording opportuni- 
ties for extending acquaintanceship among the students. 

Social gatherings similar to those of last summer, which will 
be so pleasantly remembered by all students who were in attend- 
ance, will be included in the general program which has been 
planned for the enjoyment of members of the summer school. 

General student parties are scheduled for the following dates : 
Thursday, July 6 — General Student Party — Fischers' Orchestra. 
Thursday, July 13 — General Student Party — Fischers' Orchestra. 
Wednesday, July 26— General Student Party — Fischers' Or- 
chestra. 

THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The Normal has a Christian Association for the young women 
of the school, and through the past year Bible study classes, con- 
ducted by a capable instructor, have constituted an important 
part of the work. Regular weekly meetings are held and the 
members of the association aim to be of practical help to new 
students. 

The Young Women's Christian Association aims to develop 
a spirit of mutual helpfulness among the young women of the 
Normal. The association holds four meetings a month. The or- 
ganization is vitalized by a large group of young women to whom 
its activities have proved an invaluable part of their student life. 

WOMEN'S LEAGUE 

The Women's League was organzed in 1913, and holds social 
meetings once every fortnight, throughout the school year. The 
aim of the society has been to look after the home, business, and 
social relations of the young women of the school, all of whom 
are eligible for membership. Women of the faculty are also 
eligible for associate membership and the entire organization is 
representative of democratic co-operation and social enjoyment. 




en 



SUMMER BULLETIN 13 

NEW LAW REQUIRES PROFESSIONAL TRAINING 

A law passed by the Legislature of Michigan in 1915 provided 
that after July 1, 1916 all beginning teachers in the public schools 
of Michigan must have completed not less than six weeks of 
professional training. Students graduating from Michigan high 
schools who are planning to teach may satisfy this requirement 
by attending the summer school of the Western Normal and 
securing credits in subjects specified by the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction. 



Courses Offered 



The courses offered in the summer term are as follows: 

1. Regular certificate. 

2. Review. 

3. Extension. 

4. Lecture. 

REGULAR CERTIFICATE COURSES 

A large number of classes will be formed in the branches 
included in the regular certificate courses. Several of these classes 
in the Life, Graded, and Rural Certificate groups will meet twice 
daily, thus enabling a student to cover the work of two twelve 
weeks courses during the summer term. Classes will be formed 
in a wide variety of subjects in the department of Art, Commer- 
cial Work, Domestic Art and Science, Education, English Lan- 
guage and Literature, Expression, Geography, German, History 
and Civics, Library Methods, Manual Training, Mathematics, 
Music, Physical Training, and Science. 

REVIEW COURSES 

Review classes will be formed in all of the common school 
branches. These classes will be of special benefit to students 
and teachers who are preparing for the county examinations 
to be held in August. Opportunity will be offered for reviewing 
subjects included in the first, second, and third-grade examina- 
tions. As there will be no summer schools or institutes this year 
in the counties near Kalamazoo all teachers are urged to take 
advantage of the unusual privileges offered at the Western State 
Normal. Credits earned during the six weeks' term are recorded, 
and in some subjects apply on certificate courses. There will be 
thorough reviews, and in addition courses will be so arranged in 
many subjects that students attending two or more summer 
terms may pursue work in a given study without duplicating 
subject matter. 

The subject in which review courses will be offered are Agri- 
culture, Algebra, Arithmetic, Botany, Civil Government, Course 
of Study, General History, Geography, Geometry, Grammar, 
Orthography, Penmanship, Physics, Physiology, Reading, School 
Law, Theory and Art of Teaching, and United States History. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 15 

DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SCHOOLS 

A special department gives careful attention to the prepara- 
tion of teachers for country schools. The number of school 
districts which pay a salary sufficient to command the services 
of specially prepared teachers, is rapidly increasing. The courses 
offered here to fit teachers to meet successfully the progressive 
demands of the districts, are the result of experience accumu- 
lated in working at this problem through the twelve years since 
the establishment of this institution. 

Two groups of students are seeking special preparation for 
teaching rural schools. High school graduates who desire to 
teach in rural schools are offered Course I, which may be com- 
pleted in one year and one summer term. This course leads to 
a certificate which is good for three years in any public school in 
Michigan, up to the tenth grade. Graduates of this course may 
complete the Life Certificate Course in one year. 

Another group of students who desire preparation for rural 
school teaching is made up of young people who have not com- 
pleted a high school course. Course II is offered this group. 
Students who have completed ten grades of public school work 
may complete Rural Course II in two years; and students who 
have had eleven grades of public school work may complete this 
course in one year. Students who have not had ten grades of 
school work may advance by enrolling in the High School De- 
partment until they are prepared to enter Rural Course II. The 
completion of Course II requires the same total weeks' credit as 
is required for graduation from a high school of twelve grades. 
A teacher's certificate good in any one, two, or three-room school 
in Michigan for five years is given at the completion of this 
course. Graduates of this course may complete Rural Course I 
in one year and one summer term, and the Life Certificate Course 
in two years. 

Graduates of County Normal Training Classes who have fin- 
ished the tenth grade or its equivalent before entering the Train- 
ing Classes may finish Course II in one year and Course I may be 
finished by them in two years and one summer term. Graduates 
of County Training Classes who have completed eleven grades 
before entering the Training Classes may complete Course I in 
one year and one summer term. Graduates of County Training 
Classes who have completed twelve grades before entering the 



16 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Training classes may complete Course I in one regular term and 
one summer term. Graduates of the County Training Classes, 
who attend a state normal for twelve weeks to answer the re- 
quirements for the second renewal of their certificates, should 
advise with the director of this department about their classi- 
fication. Students in any course who look forward to teaching 
in County Normal Training Classes, should elect courses in this 
department. 

The subjects of study offered in this department, may be 
briefly summarized in three groups : first, such as give a knowl- 
edge of children and of their organization, management, and in- 
struction; second, such subjects as give power for localizing the 
curriculum in natural, industrial, and domestic illustrations and 
applications; and third, a group of subjects intended to develop 
social intelligence and inspire purposes of participation and 
leadership in rural community life. Details are gven in descrip- 
tions of subjects in subsequent pages. 

Summer school students and others interested in rural school 
teaching are asked to interview or to write to the Director of 
the Department of Rural Schools. 

COUNTY NORMAL DIRECTORS AND CRITICS 

There is offered this summer a course in County Training 
Class Problems, and demonstration of rural school teaching will 
be given each forenoon in the Oakwood Rural School. This 
course is especially for teachers who are planning to teach in 
County Training Classes. 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' WEEK 

The School Commissioners of the counties, which are affiliated 
with this summer school, by vote last year decided to attend one 
day at the opening of the term, and one day at the close, and to 
be present all of the third week. A committee of commissioners 
has planned special features of interest for their week. The 
first session will be at two o'clock on Monday, July 10, and will 
be utilized for organization and informal discussion. Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Thursday there will be two sessions daily, at 
10:00 A. M., and 2:00 P. M. Tuesday will be devoted to super- 
vision with some county supervisor as leader. Wednesday will 
be in charge of State Superintendent Keeler, who will lead in 
the discussion of administration and legislation. Small high 




Another View of Normal 



SUMMER BULLETIN 17 

schools, and health problems will be considered on Thursday; 
and on Friday a lecture will be given by some woman who is a 
leader in rural education. One of the best of the general lectures 
is scheduled for Thursday of this same week. 

NORMAL EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

Through the Extension Department the Western State Nor- 
mal School offers opportunities for home study for credit to 
capable students who are unable to be in residence during the 
regular year. Such non-resident credit when combined with 
resident credit earned during summer terms is accepted on the 
various certificate courses. 

All instruction is given by members of the regular faculty 
in classes which meet at frequent intervals, usually on Satur- 
days, in centers within range of the school or by means of 
carefully organized courses offered by correspondence. All 
subjects are equivalent as nearly as may be to corresponding 
subjects in residence. 

A special announcement of this department will be furnished 
on application to the Extension Department. 

THE EXTENSION LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSE 

In 1905 the State Board of Education authorized the grant- 
ing of an extension life certificate to mature students who (1) 
are high school graduates, (2) have taught six years, and (3) 
under the direction of the Western State Normal School fac- 
ulty have completed work as follows: (a) three summer terms 
in residence, (b) not less than two years of non-resident work. 

The Western State Normal School from its foundation, has 
permitted properly qualified students to avail themselves of this 
opportunity. 

The purpose of this arrangement has been to meet the needs 
of those who are otherwise deprived of opportunities for growth 
and advancement. The fear that students by taking this course 
would be led aside from undertaking resident study, has not 
proved real; in fact, one of the important results has been an 
increase in the number of students who, after undertaking the 
extension course, have come to see that it was more possible 
than they had thought to enter upon and complete the life certi- 
ficate course in residence. 



18 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

A higher grade of work is necessary to satisfy extension 
course requirements than of average residence courses. It is the 
student whose experience has trained him to effective methods 
of organization who can profit most by studying under the di- 
rection of an absent instructor. 

LECTURES 

On Thursday, July 6 President James A. Burns 
THURSDAY, of Oneida Institute a college for the mountain 
JULY 6 whites of Kentucky and adjacent states, will 

lecture on the character, present conditions, and 
future prospects of the mountain people of the Cumberland 
region. President Burns organized Oneida Institute in 1899, 
starting without a dollar of assets. Through extraordinary de- 
votion, courage, and self-sacrifice, he and his colleagues have 
built up a splendid institute of 600 students. President Burns 
is one of the most eloquent men on the American platform and 
students of the summer school will enjoy a rare treat when he 
lectures. 

Dr. Edward Howard Griggs, Boston, will de- 
THURSDAY, liver two lectures on Thursday, July 13. His 
JULY 13 subjects will be "The World War and Ethics" 

and "The Influence of the Parent and the 
Teacher in Moral Education." Dr. Griggs is one of a very few 
American lecturers who makes an ethical appeal, who has a fund 
of philosophy in a varied field, and who, in addition to his 
ethics and philosophy possesses the rare power of stirring pop- 
ular interest. The students of the summer school will be for- 
tunate in hearing a great speaker who can handle with equal 
effect themes of social, religious or literary importance. 

On Tuesday, July 18 Miss Lutie E. Stearns of 
TUESDAY, Milwaukee will give two addresses. The first of 
JULY 18 these will be a general address for the entire 

student body on the topic "The Book for the 
Adolescent Girl." In this lecture Miss Stearns deals with one 
of the most complicated problems lecturers and librarians have 
to face in the matter of reading for the young. Miss Stearns 
who has a reputation as teacher, library expert, and general 
humanitarian, has a splendid record as a successful speaker 
before teachers' institutes and conventions. Her work is most 
highly commended wherever she has been heard. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 19 

CHAUTAUQUA 

For the fourth successive year the Redpath Chautauqua will 
be held on the Normal grounds the fifth week of summer school. 
Programs will be given morning, afternoon, and evening. Prom- 
inent lecturers and musical organizations will appear and the 
students will be offered the same high grade attractions of 
previous years. A special half rate for admission will be made 
for the students. The ticket which costs $1.25 gives admission 
to the entire program. 



Details of Departments 



Courses bearing numbers from 1 to 99 are offered in the 
Review and High School Courses; those from 101 to 199 receive 
credit in the Rural, Graded School, and Life Certificate Courses. 

Courses in the High School and Rural School Departments 
which are the same as the courses in the Graded School and 
Life Certificate work, are given the numbers of the latter. 

ART 

RURAL, GRADED AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101. Drawing from Nature. This course aims to enlarge the 
appreciation and knowledge of the world of nature by express- 
ing various phases of the landscape, also by the study and ex- 
pression of flowers, grasses, fruits, and other nature subjects, 
including figure and animal studies in various mediums, pencil, 
crayon, and Water-color. The nature motifs studied form the 
basis for problems in design which are applied to practical school 
problems. 12 weeks' credit. 

102. Perspective and Blackboard Work. This course aims to 
enlarge the appreciation and understanding of the common forms 
around us, and to develop knowledge and skill in rendering the 
appearance of forms included under the study of cylindrical and 
rectangular perspective. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS NETZORG. 
MISS GOLDSWORTHY. 

103. Construction. This course takes up the subject of hand 
work in the grades, and includes the working out of simple 
problems in weaving, basketry, clay modeling, stenciling, and 
book-binding. This course may be taken without previous 
courses in Art. 12 weeks' credit. MISS SPENCER. 

107. History and Appreciation of Art, a Survey. This course 
includes the study of Egyptian, Assyrian, Grecian and Roman 
art. Likewise the architecture, sculpture, and painting of the 
Renaissance in Germany, Italy, France and England. Special 
emphasis will be given to the study of American art, — including 
the art of the Panama Expositions — A Course in Picture Study 
for the grades will be included. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS GOLDSWORTHY. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 21 

BIOLOGY 

REVIEW AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

10. Physiology. An elementary review course for teachers 
preparing for the fall examinations. While the functions of 
the various systems of the body will be especially emphasized, 
yet enough anatomy will be given to furnish an understanding 
of the various organs. Peabody's Physiology will form the 
basis of the course. Bring all available text books. 

MR. HUNTINGTON. 

11. Botany. A review course designed to prepare teachers 
for the county examination. Bergen's Elements of Botany will 
form the basis of this course. Bring all text books available. 

DR. HARVEY. 

12. Agriculture. A review course designed to prepare teach- 
ers for the fall examination. This course will cover the whole 
general field of agriculture, dwelling on those phases which 
seem practical. Students should bring whatever agricultural 
text books they have for reference. High School Agriculture 
by Mayne and Hatch will form the basis of the course. 

MR. ROOT. 

RURAL, GRADED SCHOOL, AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES 

3. Nature Study. The place of Nature Study in the curri- 
cula of the elementary and rural school is definitely assured. 
Most teachers feel a lack of preparation not only in regard to 
subject matter, but in methods of presentation. The purpose of 
this course is to present the ideals and methods of nature study, 
to acquaint the student with available materials and give him a 
grasp of the literature of the subject. School gardens receive 
attention. Seasonal phenomena of plant and animal life are 
treated. Field and laboratory work are devoted to identification 
and ecology of our common plant and animal forms — especial 
stress being placed upon tree, bird, flower, and insect study. 
Kalamazoo offers in its diverse habitats many localities of un- 
usual interest, making an ideal center for nature study work. 
Students should bring clothing suitable for tramping, collecting 
cases, hand lenses, etc. Four afternoons of each week will be 
devoted to the work. 12 weeks' credit. MR. HUNTINGTON. 

MR. ROOT. 



22 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

120. Organic Evolution. The main object of this course is 
to present to the general student a comprehensive introduction 
to our present day knowledge of the factors and phenomena of 
organic evolution to the end that he may acquire a philosophy 
of nature and a recognition of man's place in nature as a basis 
for his thought and conduct. Twice daily, 12 weeks' credit. 

DR. HARVEY. 

CHEMISTRY 

GRADED AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

3 and 103. General Organic Chemistry. This course will be 
devoted to a study of the metals. Laboratory work is required. 
Twice daily, 12 weeks' credit. DR. McCRACKEN. 

109. Chemical Nature Study. This course is designed to 
give the student some knowledge of chemical facts and experi- 
ments that may be of use in the grades. No previous knowl- 
edge of the subject is required. Twice daily, 12 weeks' credit. 

DR. McCRACKEN. 
Note: If there are enough students wishing to begin chem- 
istry (Courses 1 and 101) a class will be organized. If there 
are students wishing special laboratory work they will be as 
far as possible accommodated. 

DOMESTIC ART 

103a. Plain Sewing. A combination of machine and hand 
work in the making of a four-piece suit of underwear. Dis- 
cussions on pattern making, materials, and various methods of 
finishing and trimming. 6 weeks' credit. MISS BLAIR. 

103b. Dressmaking. This course aims to give the student a 
practical understanding of simple drafting and designing best 
suited to the individual, and of the making, fitting and finishing 
of simple garments. Each student will make a shirt waist and 
tailored skirt of cotton or linen material and a simple lingerie 
dress. 6 weeks' credit. MISS BLAIR. 

110. Art Needlework. The object of this course is to ac- 
quaint the student with various kinds of embroidery and artistic 
needlework. The work will include applique, hemstitching, sim- 
ple drawn work, feather stitching, Bermuda fagoting, fancy 



SUMMER BULLETIN 23 

darning, scalloped edges, dots, eyelets, and French embroidery, 
tatting and crochet, applied to household linens, pillows, table 
runners, and articles of clothing. 6 weeks' credit. MISS BLAIR. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

107. Cooking. This course offers practical work in the cook- 
ing of all classes of foods, such as cereals, vegetables, meats, 
eggs, bread, pastry, salads, and desserts, 

The work is planned to meet the needs of those outside of 
the Domestic Science department who desire practical work in 
cooking. 6 weeks' credit. MISS MOORE. 

108. Cooking. This course will be given if a sufficient num- 
ber enroll. The work includes the planning, cooking, and serv- 
ing of meals at various costs. It is desired that those entering 
this class should have had some work in cooking. 6 weeks' 
credit. MISS MOORE 

EDUCATION 

RURAL, GRADED SCHOOL, AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 

1. School Management and Law. It will be the aim of this 
course to make as thorough a study as time will permit of the 
State Course of Study for Rural Schools, the General School 
Laws, and School Management. Students who own books on 
school management and related subjects should bring them. 
This course is intended to aid all who are preparing for the 
August county teachers' examinations, in three regular examina- 
tion topics: Theory and Art, Course of Study, and School Law. 
6 weeks' credit. MISS FITZPATRICK. 

MISS DIETRICH. 

101. Elementary Psychology. The greater part of the time 
of this course will be given to gaining facility in dealing with 
the problems of elementary psychology and in the use of the 
necessary vocabulary and materials. It is intended also to lay the 
foundation for the student's later work in education and es- 
pecially to assist him to a better understanding and control of 
his own methods of study. Required in Graded School and all 
Life Certificate Courses. 12 weeks' credit. MR. HOEKJE. 

102. Child Study. By means of definite assignments for ob- 
servation and the careful study of children, the student will have 
opportunity to gain further acquaintance with the interests and 



24 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

activities of the various stages of child life and youth. This will 
be supplemented by the reading of some of the more significant 
studies that have been made, by acquaintance with the more im- 
portant conclusions and problems that have been formulated and 
by observations in the Training School. Required in Graded 
School and General Life Certificate Courses. Prerequisite, 
Course 101. 6 weeks' credit. MISS SPINDLER. 

106. History of Modern Education. The development of the 
school in its relation to other social organizations. Especial 
attention will be given to the historical conditions and the men 
most significant in the understanding of present-day problems. 
Required in all Life Certificate Courses. Prerequisite, 102, 103, 
104, or 105. 12 weeks' credit. MR. JENSEN. 

107. Advanced Psychology. The aim of this course is a care- 
ful study of such problems in psychology and education as the 
learning process, the reasoning process, habituation and inhibi- 
tion in the light of the student's previous experience and train- 
ing and with the aid of as much experimentation as is practica- 
ble in the class and in small groups of the class. It will be aimed 
so to formulate the results of this study as to make it service- 
able in teaching and as a basis for independent study and re- 
search. Prerequisite, 101. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. REINHOLD. 

108. School Organization and Administration. This course is 
intended primarily for those students who are or intend to be 
superintendents or principals of schools. It will be of value, 
however, to other teachers who wish to understand better the 
conditions of efficiency in school relationships. A study will be 
made of some of the books and periodical literature of the sub- 
ject in an effort to determine influences which are manifesting 
themselves in school supervision, curricula, organizations, etc. 
Elective. 12 weeks' credit. MR. JENSEN. 

109. School Hygiene. The necessity of conserving the health 
of the child is being more and more emphasized. Hence the 
problems of mental and physical hygiene of the child as well 
as those of the various institutions as they relate to the child 
call for our earnest consideration. Among the topics taken up 
in this course will be the periods of development; the different 
methods of determining the age of the child; school diseases 
and medical inspection; measurements and tests; time tables; 
home study; examinations; fatigue; posture; school grounds, 




o 



u 



SUMMER BULLETIN 25 

buildings and decoration, and other agencies connected with the 
child's efficient development. Reports of actual conditions found 
and of possible methods of improvement will be requested. 6 
weeks' credit. MR. REINHOLD. 

110. The Philosophy of Education. In this course it will be 
the endeavor to gain some idea of the principles of education in 
accordance with the relevant laws of biology, psychology, soci- 
ology, and philosophy. Assignments will be made to the writ- 
ings of Rosenkranz, Tate, Cole, Dewey, MacVannel, and others 
who have attempted to state the nature of education in the light 
of its broader and deeper aspects. Elective. 6 weeks' credit. 

MR. REINHOLD. 

116. Rural Education. A study of the organization, admin- 
istration and curricula of rural schools. The possibilities of in- 
dustrial subjects in rural schools will be considered. Lectures, 
class discussions, and special reports will be supplemented by 
conferences to be announced in which visiting lecturers and 
others will participate. Elective. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS GREEN. 

ENGLISH 

REVIEW, RURAL II., AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 
7. Review Grammar. The purpose of this course is a thor- 
ough review for those who are making preparation for the 
county examinations. It is not accepted as credit for the course 
in grammar. MR. ROBINSON. 

99. Preparatory Composition. The elements of composition 
are treated under both form and content. The course deals with 
punctuation, word usages, paragraph and sentence structure, and 
business and social forms in letter writing. Daily practice is 
afforded in both oral and written composition. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS BAUGHMAN. 
98. Classics. This course is intended for high school stu- 
dents who need to earn a credit in English, and for teachers 
who have not had a high school course and need more work in 
literature. Several classics, including any that may be needed 
for teachers' examination, will be studied carefully in class. The 
course will also be an object lesson in the way of using litera- 
ture and reading effectively with classes in school. 12 weeks' 
credit. MRS. BISCOMB. 



26 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

RURAL I., GRADED SCHOOL, AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES 

101. Composition. A study of word usage, the sentence, and 
the paragraph, with critical work in punctuation, general manu- 
script details, and proofreading. Formal study in exposition. 
One or more detailed outlines for original expositions of some 
length are required. Individual consultations and criticisms on 
all written work. The chief aim of the course is to stimulate 
genuine thinking on the part of the student. Required in Graded 
School and all Life Certificate courses. All students in this 
course must meet the requirements of proficiency in spelling. 
12 weeks' credit. MISS MURPHY. 

102. English Literature. A general and rapid survey of the 
whole field of English literature. The time in class is given to 
lectures, reading, and interpretation of selections from the va- 
rious periods. A generous list of required reading will be as- 
signed at the beginning of the term. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS MURPHY. 

103. Literary Material for the Grades. (Course 102 pre- 
requisite.) The purpose of this course is to introduce the stu- 
dent teacher to material which is adapted to his work in the 
training school or for later independent class-room experience. 
One hour is devoted daily to discussion and criticism (1) 
of chapters in MacClintock's Literature in the Elementary 
School; (2) of literary material mentioned in MacClintock 
considered from the points of view of its fitness for children 
in school and of its value as real literature. The second hour 
is given up to lectures on the principles of literary criticism ; 
these lectures are supplemented by suggestions for guidance in 
reading and for the making of bibliographies. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS RAWLINSON. 

111. American Literature. A careful study of the chief 
American poets, supplemented with library reading from the 
chief prose writers. Several critical or interpretative essays are 
required of each student. 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS RAWLINSON. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 27 

EXPRESSION 

REVIEW COURSES 

1. Reading and Orthography. A careful study will be made 
of "The American Scholar" by Emerson. This essay is the basis 
for the county teachers' examination in Reading in August. In 
Orthography a thorough study of Pattengill's Orthography will 
be made. MISS WARRINER. 

RURAL, GRADED, AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101. Reading. This course aims to develop expressive read- 
ing and effective teaching of reading. It puts special emphasis 
on fundamental principles and therefore should precede other 
courses. 12 weeks' credit. MISS ROGERS. 

104. Story Telling. A study of the purpose of story telling 
in school and of selection of stories. Daily practice in telling 
stories. 12 weeks' credit. MISS FORNCROOK. 

GEOGRAPHY 

REVIEW COURSE 

5. Review Geography. This review course is planned to pre- 
pare for the examination in August. MR. CARRICK. 

RURAL L, GRADED SCHOOL, AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES 

101. General Geography. This course is required of all 
whose general normal work includes geography as a required 
course. 12 weeks' credit. MISS HARRISON. 

102a. The Geography of North America. A course of illus- 
trated lectures on the chief features and industries of Canada, 
United States, Mexico, and Middle America. 6 weeks' credit. 

MR. WOOD. 

103. The Geography of Europe. A course of illustrated lec- 
tures on the states of Europe, including the "War Zone," Hol- 
land, Belgium, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Greece, 
Bulgaria, and others, and also Palestine and Egypt. 6 weeks' 
credit MR. WOOD. 



28 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

107a. Commercial Geography. Lectures and Recitations. 6 
weeks' credit. MR. WOOD. 

108a. The Geography of Michigan. 6 weeks' credit. 

MR. WOOD. 
104a. The Geography of South America. 6 weeks' credit. 

MISS HARRISON. 
110. The Geography of American History. 6 weeks' credit. 

MISS HARRISON. 

GERMAN 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101. Elementary Course. Twice daily. The aim of this 
course is to give the student a knowledge of the rudiments of 
German grammar and facility in reading and reproducing easy 
German. A number of texts will be read and discussed in Ger- 
man. 12 weeks* credit. MISS ZIMMERMAN. 

114. Intermediate Course. The study of some drama or 
prose narrative, to be selected to meet the needs of the class. 
A review of German grammar and syntax and practice in speak- 
ing and writing the language. 6 or 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS ZIMMERMAN. 

115. Teachers' Course. This will be primarily a course in 
German conversation, especially designed for those who feel that 
their knowledge of the spoken language is adequate for present 
day demands in modern language instruction. The work will 
consist of the discussion of German texts in German and the 
writing of compositions and reproductions. 6 or 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS ZIMMERMAN. 
Note: A course in German Dramatics may be substituted for 
German 114 or 115, or may be taken in connection with one of 
them. Modern German plays will be studied and learned, and 
at least one will be presented on the outdoor stage. This course 
is especially recommended to teachers who are planning to do 
such work in connection with their classes. 

HISTORY 

REVIEW, RURAL II., AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 
12. General History. A review course for students expect- 
ing to take the examination for second grade certificate. The 
class will meet twice daily. 12 weeks' credit in High School 
coune. MISS WAKEMAN. 




Entrance to Normal Grounds on Oakland Drive 



SUMMER BULLETIN 29 

13. United States History. A review course to meet the needs 
of students preparing for the August examination. Four sections 
will be formed and a credit of 6 weeks in Rural School course 
may be earned. MR. MIDDLEBUSH. 

14. Civil Government. This course is planned primarily for 
students who wish to prepare for the August examination. Four 
sections will be formed. Bring any text books available. 

MR. CONKLIN. 

RURAL I., GRADED SCHOOL, AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 

COURSES 

101-2. United States History. Emphasis will be laid upon 
the different periods according to the needs of the class. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to choice of subject matter and 
bibliography suitable for grade work. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. MIDDLEBUSH. 

105. Mediaeval Europe. A study of the chief characteristics 
of the period in relation to modern civilization. 12 weeks' 
credit. ' MR. HICKEY. 

102. Europe, 1815 to date. Particular emphasis will be placed 
on the explanation of present conditions in Europe. 12 weeks' 
credit. MR. HICKEY. 

113. Rural Sociology. A study of social relations and the 
agencies for social progress in village and country. The place 
of the school in community welfare is the large question consid- 
ered. Rural Course I. and elective. 6 or 12 weeks' credit. 

MISS GREEN. 

KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION 

THE MODERN KINDERGARTEN— Conference, 11 A. M. 

This conference will grow out of the work of the children 
in the observation kindergarten and will be based upon modern 
educational theories. Problems concerning morning exercises, 
rhythms, games and hand-work will be discussed. No credit. 

FRANCES R. KERN. 

Kindergarten in session daily from 9 to 11 a. m. Will be 
open to observation by students of all the grades. 



30 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

LIBRARY 

TEACHERS' COURSE IN THE USE OF BOOKS AND 
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 

This course arranged by the State Board of Library Com- 
missioners will extend through the six weeks of the summer 
school. Instruction will be given daily in the form of lectures 
and practical problems in connection with the Commission's spe- 
cial library. 

101. Library Methods. General work consisting of daily dis- 
cussion of children's books taken from the selected library, use 
of lists and bibliographies, and one week each of lectures on 
Children's Reading and on Reference Books, given by specialists 
in these branches, sent by the Library Commission. The pur- 
pose of the work is to acquaint teachers with the best and most 
helpful material and method for work supplementary to the 
regular curriculum. 6 weeks' credit. MISS BRALEY. 

102. Library Methods. Elementary methods of library ad- 
ministration, accession, classification, cataloguing, etc., given with 
the purpose of making it possible for the teacher in charge of 
the school library to care for it and use it in the most efficient 
way, rather than for the purpose of training professional li- 
brarians. 6 weeks' credit. MISS FRENCH. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

The Manual Training Classes in Shop Work will be given in 
the new Kalamazoo Manual Training School and the new Sci- 
ence Building. The shops of the new buildings have been splen- 
didly equipped with machinery for wood-turning, pattern-mak- 
ing, machine shop, and blacksmithing. During the summer 
term classes in Manual Training will visit some of the shops 
and industries of Kalamazoo and vicinity. 

Classes in Forging and Machine Shop will be started if ad- 
vanced enrollment seems to make it desirable. 

LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSE 

101. Beginning of Wood Work. Instruction in whittling, toy 
making, and elementary bench work for grades. Use of wood 
working tools, selecting lumber and finishing. Afternoons. 12 
weeks' credit. MR. SHERWOOD. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 31 

102. Cabinet Making. Advanced work in hand work. Con- 
struction of practical furniture, estimating costs, figuring stock 
bills, selecting lumber, and finishing. Prerequisite Course 101. 
Afternoons. 12 weeks* credit. MR. SHERWOOD. 

103. Forging. Exercises in drawing-out, up-setting, twist- 
ing, welding, bending, hardening and tempering, chipping, filing, 
use of drill press, shear and punch. 12 weeks' credit. 

104. Wood-turning. Use of lathes and care of tools. Spin- 
dle, face plate, and chuck turning. Polishing and finishing of 
article made. 12 weeks' credit. MR. MANLEY. 

105. Pattern Making. Solid, parted, and loose-piece patterns. 
Molding and casting of patterns made. Prerequisite Course 104. 
12 weeks' credit. MR. MANLEY. 

106. Machine Shop. Use of lathes, drill-press, planer, etc. 
Bench work and finishing castings, fitting and filing. 12 weeks' 
credit. 

108. Mechanical Drawing. Simple elementary and geomet- 
rical problems, use and care of instruments, and lettering. Plans 
and elevations of simple shop problems. Mornings. 12 weeks' 
credit. MR. HUFF 

109. Mechanical Drawing. Continuation of descriptive geo- 
metric problems. Lettering and drawing shop problems. Pre- 
requisite Course 108. Mornings. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. HUFF. 

110. Mechanical Drawing. Isometric projection, evolutions, 
intersections, penetrations, etc. Prerequisite Course 109. Morn- 
ings. 12 weeks' credit. MR. HUFF. 

111. Mechanical Drawing. Machine details, mechanical shad- 
ing, design for equipment tracing, and blue printing. Pre- 
requisite Course 110. Afternoons. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. HUFF. 

112. Architectural Drafting. Plans, elevations, details, speci- 
fications and tracings complete of some building chosen by the 
student or a practical manual training building. Afternoons. 
12 weeks' credit. MR. HUFF. 

113. Organization. History of Manual Training. Course of 
study, arrangement of equipment, and planning of buildings. 
Selecting and purchasing tools and supplies. Mornings. 12 
weeks' credit. MR. WAITE. 



32 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

MATHEMATICS 

REVIEW, RURAL II., AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

7. Plane Geometry. Designed for those preparing for teach- 
ers' examination and those desiring a review of the subject as 
a preparatory subject. Much attention is given to method of 
attack. One section. MR. LONGMAN. 

13. Arithmetic. A review for those desiring to prepare for 
teachers' examination. Sections will be organized for all grades 
of county certificates. Five sections. MR. JENNINGS. 

14. Algebra. Review course for those preparing for teach- 
ers' examination or for students who wish to review the subject 
as a preparatory course. Two hours daily. One section. 

MR. LONGMAN. 

RURAL I., GRADED SCHOOL, AND LIFE CERTIFICATE 
COURSES 

101. Arithmetic. A teacher's course. To elect this course 
the student should have a knowledge of geometry and of the 
beginners' course in psychology. The work consists of two 
parts, divided as follows : 

(a) A study of the origin of number and its use. The his- 
tory of the development of the subject matter of arithmetic, and 
methods of teaching the subject. Assigned readings and class- 
room discussions form a prominent part of this work. 

(b) Review of some of the more difficult parts of arith- 
metic. 12 weeks' credit. Two sections. MR. EVERETT. 

MR. BLAIR. 

102. College Algebra and Analytic Geometry 102. Rectangu- 
lar and polar coordinates, simultaneous linear equations, deter- 
minants, relations between straight lines. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. EVERETT. 

103. Plane Trigonometry. This is equivalent to the work 
done during the regular session. Solution of triangles by both 
natural and logarithmic functions. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. BLAIR. 

110. Surveying. A course in field work involving actual 

problems in surveying and leveling. The final test consists of 

field notes and a map from a personal survey of an irregular 

tract. 12 weeks' credit. MR. EVERETT. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 33 

MUSIC 

101. Elements of Vocal Music. This is an academic course, 
and should precede the Teachers' Course in Music. It pre- 
supposes no previous knowledge, but deals with the very rudi- 
ments of vocal music. It consists of the cultivation of the 
ear, the voice, and the beginning of sight singing. The course 
covered is that of Book One of any of the standard music 
courses, and may be eliminated by examination. 12 weeks' 
credit. MRS. DAVIS 

103. Voice Culture I. This course includes both concert and 
individual work. Correct breathing, proper placing of the voice, 
clarity of tone, articulation and enunciation will be treated 
specifically. Some songs will be taken up for interpretation. 
This course is open to all students. Laboratory credit, 3 or 
6 weeks. MR. MAYBEE AND MRS. DAVIS. 

106. Teachers' Course in Music. This must be preceded by 
course 101 or its equivalent. Advanced sight reading and ear 
training are taken up in this class; discussion of methods, and 
practice teaching during the class period as a preparation for 
teaching this subject in the first eight grades. Observation is 
made in the training school. 12 weeks' credit. 

MR. MAYBEE. 

105. Primary Songs and Games. This course is a suggestive 
one for teachers in the primary grades as well as for specializ- 
ing students. The f ollowino- phases will be developed : Rhythm — 
feeling for and interpretation of different rhythms through 
games, balls, percussion instruments, folk dances and rhythmic 
steps. Songs — a sequence applicable to seasons and school festi- 
vals and taken from the best composers of children's songs will 
be learned. The care of the child voice and the presentation of 
these two phases to the child will also be taken up. Ability to 
play the rhythmic studies and accompaniments is desirable and 
is required from specializing students in the kindergarten and 
music courses. Observation may be made in the training school. 
6 weeks' credit. 

SPECIAL SUPERVISORS' COURSES 

109. Harmony and Ear-Training. This course is offered to 
meet the demand of the work in ear-training, melody writing 



34 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

and elementary harmony in the upper grammar grades and high 
school. 6 weeks' credit. MR. HENDERSON. 

113. Musical Appreciation and Biography. This course will 
cover the lives and works of the great masters from Bach and 
Handel down to the present time. Biographical note-book and 
programs suitable for grades and high school will be worked 
out. The victrola will be used in this course. 6 weeks' credit. 

MR. MAYBEE. 

114. Advanced Harmony and Musical Composition. This 
course is designed as a review of Elementary Harmony and ad- 
vanced work. It should be preceded by a year's work in Ele- 
mentary Harmony. The course will be of exceptional value for 
Supervisors of Music. 6 weeks' credit. MR. HENDERSON. 

122. Chorus. In view of the increasing demand for high 
school chorus concerts a cantata will be given suitable for the 
average high school chorus. The chorus will meet for two 
rehearsals each week. Chorus is required of all students en- 
rolled in music courses as a part of their regular work. This 
course is open to all students. 

MR. HENDERSON AND MR. MAYBEE. 

Orchestra. All who have instruments and wish to join the 
Normal School Orchestra will find it both pleasant and profit- 
able. MR. MAYBEE. 

129. Song Interpretation. This course is designated to meet 
the demand made for new material to be used in the grades 
and high school. Song interpretation will be a feature of this 
course. 6 weeks' credit. MR. MAYBEE. 

PENMANSHIP 

Classes in penmanship will be organized at the beginning of 
the term to suit the needs of the students. There will be a num- 
ber of sections, so that students will have an opportunity to elect 
penmanship at different hours. 

Technic and methods will be considered as well as practice 
in penmanship. Penmanship is now required of all desiring a 
certificate. No credit MR. GREENWALL. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 35 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR 
WOMEN 

102. Physical Education. This course presupposes Physical 
Training 101. It consists of Swedish and German gymnastics; 
advanced light apparatus work and folk dancing; games for 
outdoor and indoor use. 6 weeks' credit in physical education. 

Combined with either tennis or swimming, 12 weeks' credit 
and equivalent to 102 of the regular school year. 

MISS REED. 

104. Physical Education. This course presupposes Physical 
Education 101-2-3. It consists of more advanced work in all 
lines. Students are given opportunity to arrange lessons and 
conduct classes. 6 weeks' credit in physical education. 

Combined with either tennis or swimming, 12 weeks' credit 
and equivalent to 104 of the regular school year. 

MISS REED. 

109a. Playground Course. A study of the organization and 
management of the playground, its activities, equipment, aims, 
and use as a social center. MISS GUIOT. 

109b. Practice in Playground Games. 6 weeks' credit to- 
ward diploma. MISS GUIOT. 

Instruction in tennis will be given each morning at 7: 15. 

MISS GUIOT. 

Swimming classes on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. 

MISS REED. 

Note: A gymnasium suit is required for courses 102 and 104 
(bloomers, middy blouse, and shoes). 

PHYSICS 

MR. FOX 
Review Physics. A general review of elementary physics de- 
signed for those whose work in the high school has been weak 
in this subject; for those who have had limited opportunities in 
the way of laboratory work; for those who wish to review the 
subject preparatory to teaching it; and for those who are pre- 
paring to take an examination for second grade, first grade, or 
the state certificate. Credit may be earned in the rural and pre- 
paratory departments commensurate with the work done. Class 
meets from 7 to 9 daily. MR. FOX. 



36 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Elementary Laboratory Work. This course may be elected to 
accompany Review Physics, or may be elected as an independent 
course by students who have had good class room instruction 
but have had little opportunity for individual laboratory work. 
Laboratory will be open from 1 to 4, and credit will be allowed 
according to work done. MR. FOX. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

104. Physical Nature Study. A comprehensive review of se- 
lected portions of physics necessary to the analysis of problems 
which arise in the grades. Special attention given to methods of 
organization and presentation in grade work. 12 weeks* credit. 

MR. FOX. 

Advanced Laboratory Work. Open to students who have had 
courses 101, 102 and 103. Credit granted according to work ac- 
complished. Advanced laboratory will be open from 1 to 4 daily. 

MR, FOX. 

Photography. Students will have an excellent opportunity to 
advance themselves in the art of photography during the sum- 
mer term. The Physics department possesses a fine new dark 
room which will be open to students from 1 to 4, three days in 
the week. The work will be informal, the student pursuing any 
phase of photography in which he may be interested. This work 
will be supervised by Mr. Fox. 

TEACHING 

101. Principles of Teaching. (1) A study of the elementary 
school curriculum with consideration of the subject matter best 
suited to the interests and needs of each period of childhood. 
(2) The problem of motivation of school work. (3) A discus- 
sion of types of lessons and the making of lesson plans. (4) 
Systematic observation of different phases of grade work in the 
training school with reports and class discussion. 12 weeks' 
credit. MISS SPINDLER. 

102. County Training Class Problems. Demonstration of 
rural school teaching will be observed in the Oakwood Rural 
School. There will be observation in the training school, and the 
specific questions of the organization and teaching of County 
Xormal Training Classes will be considered in round-table con- 
ferences. 6 or 12 weeks' credit. MISS HUNTOON. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 37 

7. Rural School Methods. In this course special problems 
of method and subject matter for rural schools will be consid- 
ered. Special emphasis will be given to teaching reading and 
seat work possible in rural schools. At least one-half hour 
daily of observation in Training School and assigned observa- 
tion in the Oakwood Rural School are required. 6 weeks' credit. 

MISS ELLET. 
MISS HUNTOON. 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

The kindergarten, first, third, sixth and seventh grades of 
the training school will be in session from 9 to 11 a. m. each 
day for six weeks of the summer term, to accommodate those 
who wish to observe teaching in the grades. The regular super- 
visors will have charge of this work with the co-operation of 
the special teachers in drawing, music, manual training, physical 
training, domestic art, and domestic science. The work will aim 
to present proper material for use in the various subjects of 
the curriculum, such as nature study, geography, reading and 
language, and the special branches, including handwork, as well 
as to show good methods of teaching. 

It is hoped that large numbers of the students will avail 
themselves of the help thus afforded. Commissioners may ar- 
range with the director for reports of attendance of their teach- 
ers. Observation will be required in connection with the courses 
in Principles of teaching and Rural School Methods. In addi- 
tion to the observation in the Training School, observation in 
the Rural Observation School will also be required. Each super- 
visor will reserve a definite period for conference and general 
discussion with the observers in the grade and it is expected 
that students observing for credit will attend at least one con- 
ference each week. 

Students taking observation in any course for credit should 
fill out cards in the office of the Training School as soon as 
their regular enrollment is completed. These cards must be re- 
turned to Director of Training School before any credit can be 
given. MR. ELLSWORTH AND SUPERVISORS. 



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